Walking Tour: Dublin – Capital Of Ireland (4K)

Dublin, capital of the Republic of Ireland, is on Ireland’s east coast at the mouth of the River Liffey. Its historic buildings include Dublin Castle, dating to the 13th century, and imposing St Patrick’s Cathedral, founded in 1191. City parks include landscaped St Stephen’s Green and huge Phoenix Park, containing Dublin Zoo. The National Museum of Ireland explores Irish heritage and culture

Walking Tour: Dorsoduro District In Venice, Italy (4K)

Dorsoduro is Venice’s university district and the streets around the Campo Santa Margherita are filled with unpretentious eateries, indie shops and vintage fashion boutiques. After dark, informal bars draw a young local crowd. Important cultural destinations here include the Gallerie dell’Accademia, for classic Venetian masterpieces, and the waterside Peggy Guggenheim Collection, which houses modern works.

Timeline: 0:00:00​ – Intro 0:01:0​9 – FONDAMENTA ZATTERE AL PONTE LONGO 0:06:58​ – SOTOPORTEGO FIORAVANTE 0:07:47 – PONTE DE LA SCOAZZERA 0:08:33 – CAMPO S. TROVASO 0:09:04 – FONDAMENTA BONLINI 0:09:53 – PONTE S. TROVASO 0:10:27​ – FONDAMENTA NANI 0:13:26​ – FONDAMENTA ZATTERE AI GESUATI 0:18:48​ – FONDAMENTA BRAGADIN 0:20:58 – CAMPO SAN VIO 0:21:50​ – CALLE NUOVO SANT’AGNESE 0:23:33​ – PONTE DELL’ACCADEMIA 0:26:06​ – CAMPIELLO S. VIDAL

Conservation: Saving The Hargila Stork In India

A wildlife photographer travels to India intent on documenting the rarest stork on earth but soon discovers a conservation hero and her inspiring efforts to rally a community to save it.

The Greater Adjutant is a large scavenging stork that was once widely distributed across India and Southeast Asia but is now confined to a last stronghold in Assam, India, with small populations persisting in Cambodia’s northern plains region. The species is classified as Endangered by the IUCN with a rapidly declining population of around 1,200 individuals. The key threats to the species are direct human persecution, particularly at nesting colonies, habitat destruction, including felling of nest-trees, and drainage, conversion, pollution and degradation of wetlands. Historically, adjutants bred during the dry season, taking advantage of abundant prey steadily trapped by receding water levels, and scavenging the remains of now extirpated megafauna. Today, the last adjutants survive alongside humans, congregating at garbage dumps and nesting colonially in rural villages. The majority world’s remain population lives around the city of Guwahati and relies on a single garbage dump for food and nearby villages for nesting. As the adjutant’s nesting colonies occur outside of state protected areas in Assam, community conservation initiatives are the only hope for saving the bird from extinction. Through the efforts of a remarkable conservation leader, Dr. Purnima Devi Barman, and the movement she has inspired, the birds are now protected, celebrated, and increasing their numbers locally. Despite this success and the momentum to conserve the species, the Greater Adjutant’s existence remains precarious.

Village Walks: Bassano In Teverina, Central Italy (4K)

Bassano in Teverina is a comune in the Province of Viterbo in the Italian region Latium. It is inhabited by 1,332 people and is located about 90 kilometres north of Rome and about 20 kilometres northeast of Viterbo. 

The origin of the town is extremely uncertain. The ending of the name, derived from the Latin adjectival suffix -anus, takes back to Roman times and, together with the root of the name, seems to remember the family name (Bassus) of a character who owned large estates in the area: Bassus – Bassanus – Bassano.

The town center of Bassano in Teverina arises on a tuff spur set in a slightly rearward position compared to the Tiber Valley, of which it overlooks one part. Downstream from the city center, not far away from the Tiber, lies Lake Vadimo, locally known as the “Pond”, described by Pliny the Younger as “a lying wheel with a regular circumference […] paler, greener and more intense than the sea.”

In Roman times the lake, called Lacus Vladimonis, besides being larger was also considered sacred: near its shores, the Etruscans performed rituals and periodic celebrations, while in its waters the Romans immersed their weapons to make them invincible.

The little center was already inhabited in Etruscan times but was abandoned during the domination of Romans, who conquered the whole surrounding area, taking the territory thanks to two bloody battles: the first in 309 BC, under the leadership of the consul Quintus Fabius Rullianus, and the second in 283 BC, with which they finally defeated Etruscans and Senones.

Science: Cloning Saves An Endangered Species And Exoplanet ‘Super-Earths’

On this week’s show: How cloning can introduce diversity into an endangered species, and ramping up the pressure on iron to see how it might behave in the cores of rocky exoplanets.

First up this week, News Intern Rachel Fritts talks with host Sarah Crespi about cloning a frozen ferret to save an endangered species.

Also this week, Rick Kraus, a research scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, talks about how his group used a powerful laser to compress iron to pressures similar to those found in the cores of some rocky exoplanets. If these super-Earths’ cores are like our Earth’s, they may have a protective magnetosphere that increases their chances of hosting life.

History: Legacy Of French Playwright Molière

He’s known as the father of French #theatre, but the influence of #Molière goes well beyond France. His impact is still felt today all over the world. To mark the 400th #anniversary of the famed playwright’s birth, we speak to Georges Forestier, professor at the Sorbonne and a specialist in the works of Molière. We also take you on a tour of Molière’s Paris.

News, Views and Reviews for the 55+