Interviews: 97-Year Old Nobel Prize Chemist John B. Goodenough On Wisdom, Love And Life

Interview with the 2019 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry John B. Goodenough, 6 December 2019

0:07 – What advice would you give to a younger version of yourself?  0:32 – How do you recognise a good teacher?  0:58 – Do you see yourself as a mentor now?  1:33 – What qualities do you think you need to be a successful scientist?   3:04 – How do you cope with failure?   3:16 – How has your dyslexia shaped you?  3:44 – How important has nature been for you?      4:40 – Has music played an important role in your life?   5:06 – How did your interest in poetry start?   6:14 – How did you meet your wife?   7:06 – What life advice can you share?   8:30 – How do you remember so much of your life?   8:47 – How does it feel to be back in Stockholm after 80 years?   9:21 – How has living through World War II influenced you? 10:03 – What is your relationship with your lab colleagues?   11:18 – What are the characteristics of a very good team?  11:55 – What is your relationship with Akira Yoshino?   12:28 – How has the scientific landscape has changed over the years?   13:42 – What environment encourage creative thinking?   14:48 – What research are you working on now?   15:39 – What are your thoughts on sustainability?   16:37 – What future do you see for sustainable batteries?

John Bannister Goodenough born July 25, 1922) is an American materials scientist, a solid-state physicist, and a Nobel laureate in chemistry. He is a professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at the University of Texas at Austin. He is widely credited with the identification and development of the lithium-ion battery, for developing the Goodenough–Kanamori rules in determining the sign of the magnetic superexchange in materials, and for seminal developments in computer random access memory.

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