Tag Archives: Northwestern Italy

Walking Tours: Rapallo In Northwestern Italy (4K)

Rapallo is a town on the Italian Riviera coastline. It’s known for the hilltop Sanctuary of Our Lady of Montallegro, a pilgrimage site with sea views. The Castello di Rapallo, a 16th-century fortress, sits on the waterfront. Southwest, near Portofino village, 10th-century San Fruttuoso Abbey sits in a small cove. Nearby, the Portofino Protected Marine Area includes the underwater Christ of the Abyss bronze statue.

Village Walks: Tellaro In Liguria, Northwest Italy

Tellaro is a small fishing village, perched on a cliff on the east coast of the Gulf of La Spezia in Liguria, northern Italy. It is a frazione of the comune of Lerici. It has been rated as one of the most beautiful villages in Italy Tellaro has been the destination for many Italian and foreign artists.

Village Walks: Portofino – The Italian Riviera (4K)

Portofino is a fishing village on the Italian Riviera coastline, southeast of Genoa city. Pastel-colored houses, high-end boutiques and seafood restaurants fringe its Piazzetta, a small cobbled square overlooking the harbor, which is lined with super-yachts. A path leads from the Piazzetta to Castello Brown, a 16th-century fortress and museum with art exhibitions and panoramic views of the town and the Ligurian Sea. 

Walking Tour: Vernazza – Cinque Terre, Italy (4K)

Vernazza is one of the 5 centuries-old villages that make up the Cinque Terre, on northwest Italy’s rugged Ligurian coast. Colorful houses surround its small marina. The Santa Margherita di Antiochia Church has a bell tower topped by an elegant cupola. Clinging to the rocks, Doria Castle is a medieval defensive structure with a cylindrical tower. The Belforte bastion is just below it.

Travel Views: Portovenere – Northwestern Italy (4K)

Porto Venere is a village on the Ligurian coast of northwestern Italy. It’s known for Porto Venere Regional Natural Park, a protected area with trails and dive sites. The park encompasses Palmaria Island, dotted with beaches and caves. The Gothic-style Church of St. Peter sits atop a rocky headland. Nearby is the centuries-old Castello Doria, an imposing clifftop fortress with views of the Gulf of Poets.

Aerial City Views: Genoa – Northwestern Italy (4K)

Genoa (Genova) is a port city and the capital of northwest Italy’s Liguria region. It’s known for its central role in maritime trade over many centuries. In the old town stands the Romanesque Cathedral of San Lorenzo, with its black-and-white-striped facade and frescoed interior. Narrow lanes open onto monumental squares like Piazza de Ferrari, site of an iconic bronze fountain and Teatro Carlo Felice opera house. 

Walking Tour: ‘Ravenna – Northwestern Italy’ (4K)

Ravenna is a city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy. It’s known for the colorful mosaics adorning many of its central buildings, like the octagonal Basilica di San Vitale, the 6th-century Basilica di Sant’Apollinare Nuovo and the cross-shaped Mausoleo di Galla Placidia. North of the center, the Mausoleo di Teodorico built in the 6th century for King Theodoric the Great, is a Gothic, circular stone tomb with a monolithic dome.

Walking Tours: ‘Manarola – Cinque Terre, Italy’ (4K)

Manarola is a small town, a frazione of the comune of Riomaggiore, in the province of La Spezia, Liguria, northern Italy. It is the second-smallest of the famous Cinque Terre towns frequented by tourists, with a population of 353.

The origin of the village is linked to the need of the populations who lived on the Gulf of Gaeta to move to new settlements in a protected position on the surrounding hills, to defend against Saracen raids. Maranola is mentioned for the first time in 1029 and again in 1045, when it is indicated as castrum, a place fortified with walls and towers. In 1041 the existence of a “via carraria de Maranola” is also attested. Under the Caetani a new wall with three towers was then built, the only access to which was the so-called “ravellino”, demolished at the end of the 19th century. The village was placed under siege in 1347 by Nicola Caetani as part of the clashes conducted to regain Mola, Castellone and Traetto. His son, Onorato I Caetani, had a castle built there which took from him the name of “Castello Onorato”. In April 1400 it was besieged by the troops of Ladislao I of Naples. In the 15th century it had the status of a *university* and the statute states that it included the hamlets of Mamurrano, Ponzanello and Trivio in its territory. In 1414 the property was sold to Pietro Origlia, count of Caiazzo, but Cristoforo Caetani took it back by force. In 1428 it became an autonomous municipality together with a quarter of the territory of Maranola. In 1491 it was in possession of Caterina Pignatelli, in 1504 by Prospero Colonna and in 1691 it passed to the Carafa, who kept it until the abolition of feudalism in 1806.