Tag Archives: Cinematic Nostalgia

Movie Nostalgia: It’s Been 60 Years Since “Best Ever” Big-Screen Comedy “Some Like It Hot” Opened (1959)

From a BBC.com cuture article:

Some Like It Hot movie sceneFaced with the question of why Some Like It Hot has topped BBC Culture’s poll of the best ever big-screen comedies, it’s tempting to say something similar. Wilder’s glittering masterpiece doesn’t just use the handsomest kid in town (and a terrific actor, to boot), but its most radiant sex symbol, Marilyn Monroe, and one of its most dexterous comedians, Jack Lemmon. It also has a bevy of bathing beauties, a crowd of sinister mafiosi, a glamorous seaside setting in the roaring ‘20s, and a sizzling selection of songs.

It is structured so meticulously that it glides from moment to moment with the elegance of an Olympic figure skater, and the consummate screwball dialogue, by Wilder and IAL Diamond, is so polished that every line includes either a joke, a double meaning, or an allusion to a line elsewhere in the film. To quote one character, it’s a riot of “spills, thrills, laughs and games”. To quote another, it deserves to be “the biggest thing since the Graf Zeppelin”. So why was it chosen as the best comedy ever made? Simple. What else were we going to choose?

To read more click on the following link: http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20170817-why-some-like-it-hot-is-the-greatest-comedy-ever-made

Cinematic Nostalgia: “Jay Myself” Documents Life Of NYC Artist/Photographer Jay Maisel, End Of An Era

DSC1245_A-1JAY MYSELF documents the monumental move of renowned photographer and artist, Jay Maisel, who, in February 2015 after forty-eight years, begrudgingly sold his home—the 36,000 square-foot, 100-year-old landmark building in Manhattan known simply as “The Bank.” Through the intimate lens of filmmaker and Jay’s protégé, noted artist and photographer Stephen Wilkes, the viewer is taken on a remarkable journey through Jay’s life as an artist, mentor, and man; a man grappling with time, life, change, and the end of an era in New York City.

Cinematic Nostalgia: “When Harry Met Sally” Was The First Romantic Comedy For Boomers

From a Vanity Fair article by Sonia Saraiya

“Ephron and Reiner’s love language pushed the envelope in 1989 in a way that seems rather tame now: As I grew up and began to dabble in romantic partnerships myself, When Harry Met Sally… felt like the rare option I wanted to emulate and embody, and I studied it like a textbook. In many ways, it’s a manual for romantic partnership—a funny, entertaining film that’s closely attentive to the nuts and bolts of falling in love.”

When Harry Met Sally Movie 1989

My first memory of When Harry Met Sally… is that I wasn’t allowed to watch it. When I think about the film now, I see it as a romance—an inverted one, where love does not come until 12 years after first sight, but a love story nonetheless. But When Harry Met Sally…’s unwholesome raciness—the faked orgasm, the f-bombs, the woman who meows in the throes of passion—featured prominently in the film’s marketing campaign. So did the film’s central, provocative, deeply heteronormative question: Can men and women ever “just” be friends? And it needed an R rating to answer that question, too! The film glowed with forbidden allure.

To read more click on link below:

https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2019/07/when-harry-met-sally-30-anniversary-toast