Tag Archives: New York

Culture: “Anger” In Society Explored By Artists And Writers (MoMA Video)

 

Anger. A word that often does the rounds in the 21st century. On a global scale, citizens are increasingly dissatisfied with their governments — from discord within the current American administration to rising hostility within France, Germany, Greece, Iraq, and Lebanon. Anger due to the persistence of racial violence, threats against the rights of women and workers, discrimination against the LGBTQ community, repression, as well as fear and instability surrounding health care systems, income inequality, the environmental crisis, and the effects of mass migration.

MoMA Research & Development

Join a nuanced conversation in this MoMA R&D Salon hosted by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator of Architecture & Design and Director of Research & Development at MoMA, with speakers (in alphabetical order):

Shaun Leonardo: a multidisciplinary artist whose work discusses societal expectations of manhood––namely definitions surrounding black and brown masculinities––along with its notions of achievement, collective identity, and experience of failure.

Lydia Lunch: a writer, singer, poet, actress, and speaker whose career was spawned by the New York City “No Wave” scene. Widely considered one of the most influential performers originating from New York City, Lydia has worked with a range of bands and artists.

Andrew Marantz: a staff writer at The New Yorker, where he has worked since 2011. His work has also appeared in Harper’s, New York, and Mother Jones. He recently published his first book, Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation.

Marilyn Minter: a contemporary artist whose works are in the collections of MoMA, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, among others.

Pamela Sneed: a poet, writer, visual artist, and performer. She is the author of the books Imagine Being More Afraid of Freedom than Slavery (1998) and Kong and Other Works (2009), as well as the chapbooks Lincoln (2014), Gift (2015), and Sweet Dreams (2018).

Top Travel Destinations: Photos From The New Empire State Building 80th Floor Observatory

From Empire State Building Twitter:

Our 80th Floor is officially re-opened – the final stage of our visitor experience redesign! The floor includes a special @nycgo  exhibit that will create a custom itinerary for the rest of your trip, based on questions you answer about your interests! esbo.nyc/bc1

Empire State Building 80th Floor Observatory

Metropolitan Museum: “Mechanical Marvels – Automation” From 17th & 18th Century (Videos)

The mahout (elephant keeper), the turbaned Ottoman warriors, and the crowning crescent all allude to the Eastern origins of the elephant. Within the Kunstkammer the elephant represented rulership. This automaton clock, which strikes at both the quarter hour and the hour, is driven by a movement connected to a wheel mounted on the walkway of the howdah (saddle). On the hour, the four Muslim warriors revolve around the brickwork tower. The mahout thumps his arm up and down, as though he were leading the animal, and his counterweighted eyes move back and forth as the machine travels.

Presented to Empress Maria Theresa in Vienna in 1760, this automaton was made at the height of the “century of writing.” Written communication connected scientists, dignitaries, scholars, and artists across long distances, and the act of writing was celebrated in every form. This piece is the last in a series of increasingly complicated ones that Friedrich von Knaus produced during his tenure as Austrian court machinist; he presented other examples to dignitaries such as the French king Louis XV and Duke Charles Alexander of Lorraine.

The machine writes through the hand of the small statuette seated at its top, one of the first mechanical writing figures in human form. This video shows the mechanisms inside the sphere that produce its precise movements. Up to 107 words can be preprogrammed by the arrangement of pegs on a barrel. The figure can also be set via a hand-worked control to appear to write from dictation; this technology that presaged the first typewriter.

Duke Charles Alexander of Lorraine, who bought this automaton clock in 1777, collected luxury objects made in his realm that demonstrated local technical advances. The self-moving components of this timepiece represent the height of Flemish invention in a fashionable Neoclassical style. Mechanically complex and visually impressive, this sparkling clock was a worthy addition to the duke’s collection of timepieces and scientific instruments.

This video shows the movement of the dials for hours, minutes, and seconds; days of the month; and phases of the moon, as well as that of the seven dynamic design elements. The cross-of-Lorraine pendulum swings steadily over the main dial, underneath a dancing letter M. Above the calendar dial turns a Catherine wheel, while the four dragons supporting the obelisk flap their wings and spit pearls. Another Catherine wheel spins above the moon-phase dial, and the entire obelisk is topped by a rotating planetarium. The fourth dial shows the maker’s signature.

Website: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/making-marvels-science-splendor

 

New Destination Bars: “Fever-Tree Porch” Is In “Iconic Location” In NYC

From a Forbes.com online review:

A collection of mixed drinks at the new Fever-Tree Porch at Bryant ParkANTHONY DEEYINGExpect many of those chairs to be filled in the months ahead. The Winter Village is a huge draw, built around a massive ice rink enjoyed by upwards of 300,000 skaters throughout the holiday season. “We want people to enjoy great cocktails and drinks at the Porch, to take time to relax and appreciate the city with all its extraordinary energy,”

Earlier this month, cocktails started pouring at Fever-Tree Porch–a new, branded bar in Manhattan’s tree-lined Bryant Park. The year-long partnership marks the first of its kind between one of New York City’s premiere public spaces and the world’s top-selling purveyor of premium tonics and mixers. It also provides an al fresco outpost for some of the 12 million visitors making their way through the destination, annually. Given its prime location at the corner of 6th Avenue and 40th Street–one of the most trafficked sections in the country–the folks behind it are gearing up to serve as many as 75,000 cocktails over the course of the next 12 months.

To read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/bradjaphe/2019/11/13/fever-tree-opens-its-first-ever-branded-bar-in-new-york-city/#56dae5434636

Museum Insider: Curators & Artists Oversee New Frames, Placement Of Paintings At MoMA (Video)

The new MoMA opens. Cherished works return to the walls of the galleries in brand new frames, while curators and artists watch the completion of the reinstallation. After being closed for four months, MoMA reopens its doors to the public.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

0:13 – Associate sculpture conservator Roger Griffith and sculpture conservation fellow Joy Bloser clean Arthur Young’s Bell-47D1 Helicopter.

0:52 – Senior curator of Painting and Sculpture Anne Umland and chief curator of Painting and Sculpture Ann Temkin oversee the hanging of Pablo Picasso’s “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.”

1:20 – Peter Perez, frame shop foreman, discusses “The Starry Night’s” new, black frame.

2:53 – Artist Amy Sillman explains how she curated and arranged “The Shape of Shape,” part of the long-running Artist’s Choice exhibition series in which artists selects works to show from the Museum’s collection

4:17 – Photography curator Sarah Meister and conservator Lee Ann Daffner adjust the lighting on Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey’s “Rome. Arch of Septimus Severus and Capitoline Lion.”

5:02 – Senior deputy director of exhibitions and collections Ramona Bronkar Bannayan and director of exhibition design and production Lana Hum make a final checklist of things to accomplish before the opening.

5:32 – Artist Betye Saar sees her exhibition for the first time.

7:11 – Manager of enterprise applications Rik Vanmechelen and developer Ryan Sprott check the new ticket machines.

8:04 – Chief facilities and safety officer Tunji Adeniji welcomes the public to the new MoMA on opening day.

8:30 – Silent film accompanist Ben Model improvises a live piano soundtrack for Frank Powell’s 1915 film “A Fool There Was.”

9:12 – Security supervisor Chet Gold greets volunteer Fred Liberman. Gold returns to his favorite room in the new MoMA.

Restaurant Reviews: The “Pilar Cuban Eatery & Bakery” In Brooklyn – “Authentic Delicacies”

From a New Yorker online review:

Pilar Cuban EateryChief among these delicacies is Cuban lard bread, which is what inspired the opening of Pilar Cuban Bakery: Ricardo Barreras, the owner of Pilar Cuban Eatery, next door, decided to start baking it himself, using dough, shipped frozen, from a trusted supplier in Florida. When he realized that his kitchen wasn’t big enough for the operation, he figured he might as well open a second place.

On a recent morning in Bed-Stuy, a young boy pressed his face against the glass case at Pilar Cuban Bakery and began to moan. “Mom, Mom, Mooooom. I want this!” he declared plaintively, pointing to an enticingly glossy Key-lime pie, sliced into neat wedges. “And what about this?” he exclaimed, moving on to the coconut-chocolate bars.

To read more: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/11/11/the-auspicious-treats-of-pilar-cuban-bakery-and-win-son-bakery

Museum Exhibitions: “The Renaissance Of Etching” At The Metropolitan Museum Thru Jan. 20, 2020

From a MetMuseum.org online release:

The Renaissance of Etching Metropolitan Museum NYThis exhibition traces the first sixty years of the etched print (circa 1490 to circa 1560), from its emergence in the workshop of the German printmaker and armor decorator Daniel Hopfer to the years when a range of artists from Germany, Flanders, Italy, and France began experimenting with etching. Approximately 125 etchings, produced by both renowned and lesser-known artists, are displayed alongside a number of drawings, printing plates, illustrated books, and armor.

The history of printmaking has been punctuated by moments of great invention that have completely changed the course of the medium. The beginning of etching in Europe in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries—when the technique moved out of the workshop of armor decorators and into those of printmakers and painters—represents one of those pivotal moments. Etching, essentially drawing on the surface of a metal plate, had an ease that opened the door for all kinds of artists to make prints. The pioneers of the medium included some of the greatest painters of the Renaissance, such as Albrecht Dürer, Parmigianino, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder.

To read more: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/renaissance-of-etching

Cocktail Scene: “Dante” In New York City Voted “2019 Worlds Best Bar”

From a Food & Wine online article:

Dante NYC Negroni…at Camden’s Roundhouse in London, the annual list of the World’s 50 Best Bars was announced—and this year, New York’s Dante took home the grand prize. The West Village aperitivo bar and restaurant, which is famous for its extensive Negroni menu (and pop-up Negroni fountain), was ranked in 9th place on last year’s list, and also won “World’s Best Bar” and “Best American Restaurant Bar” at Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans earlier this year. 

The World's 50 Best BarsThe World’s 50 Best Bars 2019

1. Dante–New York

2. Connaught Bar–London

3. Florería Atlántico–Buenos Aires

4. The NoMad–New York

5. American Bar–London

6. The Clumsies–Athens

7. Attaboy–New York City

8. Atlas–Singapore

9. The Old Man–Hong Kong

10. Licorería Limantour–Mexico City

11. Manhattan–Singapore

12. Native–Singapore

13. Carnaval–Lima

14. Katana Kitten–New York

15. Guilhotina–São Paulo

16. Three Sheets–London

17. Himkok–Oslo

18. High Five–Tokyo

19. Salmón Gurú–Madrid

20. Paradiso–Barcelona

To read more: https://www.foodandwine.com/news/worlds-best-bars-2019?did=446693-20191021&utm_campaign=faw-travel-tips_newsletter&utm_source=foodandwine.com&utm_medium=email&utm_content=102119&cid=446693&mid=25675223965

Architecture: The Frank Lloyd Wright Designed Guggenheim Museum Celebrates 60th Year

Frank Lloyd Wright Guggenheim MuseumThis year marks the 60th anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright’s building for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Since opening its doors on October 21, 1959, the architectural icon has inspired countless visitors and is widely seen as Wright’s masterpiece.

From its opening to the present day, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum has been an unparalleled physical and cultural presence in the New York landscape.

Over the course of the sixteen-year period between the commissioning of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 1943 and its 1959 opening, the project underwent a series of revisions. The iconic spiral form remained primarily unchanged, but a close reading of documents in the Guggenheim Museum Archives sheds additional light on an array of obscure details that were designed out over time to accommodate budgetary, programmatic, and structural needs and constraints.

To read more: https://www.guggenheim.org/the-frank-lloyd-wright-building

Top New Exhibitions: “The Last Knight” At The Metropolitan Museum, NYC Through Jan 5, 2020

From the MetMuseum.org online:

The Last Knight Metropolitan Museum of Art Exhibition BookThe Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximilian I examines the profound significance of European armor at the dawn of the Renaissance, through the lens of Emperor Maximilian I’s (1459–1519) remarkable life. On view only at The Met, The Last Knight coincides with the five-hundredth anniversary of Maximilian’s death, and is the most ambitious North American loan exhibition of European arms and armor in decades. Including 180 objects selected from some thirty public and private collections in Europe, the Middle East, and the United States, The Last Knight will explore how Maximilian’s unparalleled passion for the trappings and ideals of knighthood served his boundless worldly ambitions, imaginative stratagems, and resolute efforts to forge a lasting personal and family legacy.

This exhibition features many works of art on view outside Europe for the first time, including Maximilian’s own sumptuous armors that highlight his patronage of the greatest European armorers of his age, as well as related manuscripts, paintings, sculpture, glass, tapestry, and toys, all of which emphasize the emperor’s dynastic ambitions and the centrality of chivalry at the imperial court and beyond.

To read more: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/last-knight-art-armor-ambition-maximilian?utm_source=Exhibitions&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2019_1019_Met_Exhibitions