Wine Regions: Origins Of Barolo In Northern Italy

Silvia Donati |
Fri, 01/08/2021

Barolo is made from the Nebbiolo grape, or more precisely, from three sub-varieties of Nebbiolo, whose name recalls the fog (‘nebbia’ in Italian) that often envelopes the hills and valleys where it’s made at the time of the vendemmia.  

Just eleven comuni (towns) are allowed to produce Barolo, all comprised within a small area in the province of Cuneo, to the east of the regional capital of Turin: La Morra, Barolo, Verduno, Castiglione Falletto, Monforte d’Alba, Serralunga, Novello, Roddi, Grinzano Cavour, Diano d’Alba and Cherasco.

Among Italy’s Unesco World Heritage Sites aren’t just artworks, castles, cities and monuments; there are also entire areas, such as the vineyard landscape of Langhe-Roero and Monferrato in the north-western region of Piedmont; this landscape constitute, according to Unesco, “an outstanding example of man’s interaction with his natural environment,” and an “outstanding living testimony to winegrowing and winemaking traditions that stem from a long history, and that have been continuously improved and adapted up to the present day.” 

It is precisely in this area that one of the world’s greatest wines originated: Barolo

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