Tag Archives: Nature Views

Montana Views: Red Fox Kits In Paradise Valley

“Sunday Morning” shows us a vixen with her paws full, in Paradise Valley, Montana. Videographer: Judith Lehmberg.

Red fox are found throughout Montana. They can make their home while following their food source. Foxes use their nose to find prey, and then quickly pounce, much like a house cat. Spotting a red fox in Montana is never difficult if you look carefully?just keep a close watch for the bushy tail.

Nature: A Great Horned Owl Chick In Florida

“Sunday Morning” takes us to Titusville, Florida, where a great horned owl chick is being cared for by Mom and Dad. Videographer: Doug Jensen.

Great horned owls are usually 18 – 25 inches tall, have tall ear tufts, and large yellow eyes. Their size, ear tufts, and eyes make them easily recognizable when seen during daylight hours.

They are found throughout Florida and roost in large, messy nests, in tall trees. The female is larger than the male, but the male has a larger and deeper voice box.

North Carolina Views: Elk In Great Smoky Mountains

“Sunday Morning” takes us among the elk and turkeys at the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina. Videographer: Scot Miller.

Elk are the second-heftiest members of the deer family, after the bigger and darker-haired moose. While there’s really no mixing up those two giant deer, the names are definitely a cause for confusion from an international perspective. In Europe, what North Americans call moose are known as “elk.” The word “moose” is an indigenous North American (likely Algonquin) word, and in New England, early European colonists distinguished between the “black moose”—the moose as we know it today—and the “grey moose,” or elk.

Nature View: Bald Eagles Soar In New York City

Bald eagles were nearly extinct in New York City due to environmental factors such as pollution and pesticides. Michael George spoke to an urban park ranger sergeant who participated in the two-decade effort to bring the birds back to the city.

The bald eagle is a bird of prey found in North America. A sea eagle, it has two known subspecies and forms a species pair with the white-tailed eagle, which occupies the same niche as the bald eagle in the Palearctic. 

Views: North American River Otters In Maine

“Sunday Morning” visits otters on the hunt for fish at a pond in Portland, Maine. Videographer: Mauricio Handler.

 The North American River Otter (Lontra canadensis) is the species of otter found in Maine, and you’ll find lots of them along the entire coast (and probably inland as well). River otters are mostly nocturnal members of the weasel family (Mustelidae) and rather large, growing up to 3.5 feet long and weighing around 30 pounds. They are referred to as “semi-aquatic,” since they spend most of their waking hours in water and come to land when denning, moving from one body of water to another, or marking a territory.

Nature: Trumpeter Swans Near Cayuga, New York

We leave you this Sunday among trumpeter swans braving winter’s chill near Cayuga, New York. Videographer: Carl Mrozek.

The trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator) is a species of swan found in North America. The heaviest living bird native to North America, it is also the largest extant species of waterfowl, with a wingspan of 185 to 250 cm (6 ft 2 in to 8 ft 2 in). It is the American counterpart and a close relative of the whooper swan (Cygnus cygnus) of Eurasia, and even has been considered the same species by some authorities. By 1933, fewer than 70 wild trumpeters were known to exist, and extinction seemed imminent, until aerial surveys discovered a Pacific population of several thousand trumpeters around Alaska’s Copper River. Careful reintroductions by wildlife agencies and the Trumpeter Swan Society gradually restored the North American wild population to over 46,000 birds by 2010.

Nature Views: Pronghorn Antelope In Montana (CBS)

“Sunday Morning” takes us among pronghorn antelope at play near Virginia City in Montana. Videographer: Brad Markel.

The pronghorn is a species of artiodactyl (even-toed, hoofed) mammal indigenous to interior western and central North America. Though not a true antelope, it is known colloquially in North America as the American antelopeprong buckpronghorn antelopeprairie antelope, or simply antelope because it closely resembles the antelopes of the Old World and fills a similar ecological niche due to parallel evolution. It is the only surviving member of the  family Antilocapridae.

Nature: Buffalo National River, Northern Arkansas

Sunday Morning” takes us to the banks of the Buffalo National River in northern Arkansas. Videographer: Scot Miller.

The Buffalo River, located in Northern Arkansas, was the first National River to be designated in the United States. The Buffalo River is 153 miles long. The lower 135 miles flow within the boundaries of an area managed by the National Park Service, where the stream is designated the Buffalo National River.