Tag Archives: Cattle

Austria: Almatrieb Cattle Parade 2022, Tyrolean Alps

In an annual festive procession in the Tyrolean Alps known as the Almabtrieb, herders and specially groomed cattle descend into the valley after a summer in higher pastures. Their return to the foothill farms is marked with parades, parties and feasting.

The “Almabtrieb” is a custom that goes back 500 years. The steady clang of cowbells accompanies the cattle on their long journey from high alpine pastures back into the valley. Thousands of spectators celebrate their return as Leonhard “Hartl” Thaler leads the herd into town. The 62-year-old is a well-known figure in his Tyrolean hometown of Reith im Alpbachtal – as a farmer, cattle dealer, innkeeper and musician.

Views: Green River Drift Cattle Drive In Wyoming

Hitch a ride with 60 Minutes correspondent Bill Whitaker along the Green River Drift, the longest running cattle drive in the U.S.

Upper Green River Valley, Wyoming

Predating most federal land management agencies, the Green River Drift cattle trail has been continuously used since the 1890s by the Upper Green River Cattle Association ranchers to get cattle from spring pasture on the desert to summer pasture in the forest. Chilly fall weather causes the cattle to “drift” back out of the forest to return to their home ranches. The trail, 58 miles long with 41 miles of spurs, crosses BLM, State of Wyoming, National Forest, and private properties.

Travel & Adventure Video: Four Months On A Remote Patagonian Horse Ranch

Filmed and Edited by: Dan Sadgrove

Voiceover by Ólafur Darri Ólafsson
Music by Tim Tregonning
Sound by Morgan Johnson
Color by Mike Rossiter
Aerial by Wade Sedgwick

In early 2019 I spent four months living in a tent at Estancia Ranquilco, a remote horse and cattle ranch nestled deep in the foothills of the Andean mountains in Northern Patagonia, Argentina. Largely stripped of modern conveniences and offering a chance to experience off-grid, communal living, it is both a gentle, and harsh, return to primitiveness.

Yet the magnetic pull from Ranquilco reaches far beyond the realms of sentimentalism. It is not merely a vague summation of its parts. Of earth, water, sun, grass and trees. It is the past as well as the present, built into the stonework and in the footsteps of the worn paths on the last edges of land, hanging on the horizon.

For those devoted to this way of life, it is simply a return to the familiar.

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