Tag Archives: Veneto

Walking Tour: Padua In Northeastern Italy (4K)

Padua is a city in Northern Italy’s Veneto region. It’s known for the frescoes by Giotto in its Scrovegni Chapel from 1303–05 and the vast 13th-century Basilica of St. Anthony. The basilica, with its Byzantine-style domes and notable artworks, contains the namesake saint’s tomb. In Padua’s old town are arcaded streets and stylish cafes frequented by students of the University of Padua, established in 1222. 

Walking Tours: Verona – Northeastern Italy (4K)

Verona is a city in northern Italy’s Veneto region, with a medieval old town built between the meandering Adige River. It’s famous for being the setting of Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” A 14th-century residence with a tiny balcony overlooking a courtyard is said be “Juliet’s House.” The Verona Arena is a huge 1st-century Roman amphitheater, which currently hosts concerts and large-scale opera performances.

Travel & Cycling: 87-Mile Lake Garda, Italy Bike Path Opens In 2021 – “Gorgeous”

The 140-km bike path will offer amazing views over Italy’s largest lake and the mountains that surround it. It is expected to attract many bike enthusiasts who already travel to the area to ride on the Dolomites paths.

It will circle beautiful Lake Garda in northern Italy from Capo Reamol on the lake’s western shore to Limone sul Garda at the border with Trentino. The path crosses three regions, Lombardy, Trentino and Veneto and uses both existing cycling tracks and newly built paths.  

Lake Garda is already a paradise for those who love exploring on a bike; from 2021, even more so, as the so-called Garda by Bike project, is scheduled to be completed. 

The project has been in the works for two years and the stretch that is yet to be completed promises to be one of the most spectacular as it’s built right above the lake, next to cliffs that almost jut out into the water.  

Website

The path is suitable for everyone as it’s 2.5 meters wide and doesn’t have any particularly steep section. It can be biked on both road and mountain bikes. The speed limit is 30 km per hour. 

And if you don’t like biking, no worries: the path includes a pedestrian lane for those who prefer walking.  

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